Police militarisation

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The German arms company Sig Sauer has announced it intends to close its arms factory in Eckernförde by the end of year. The company blamed "locational handicaps" and the German military and police preferring a "few other local producers".

The online newspaper Byline Times has challenged the UK's government over arms sales to Chile, after a Freedom of Information request found that 50% of the £164 million worth of arms licensed for sale since 2008 had been granted in the last year.

Pindad PT is an Indonesian state-owned arms company, producing a wide range of weapons for the Indonesian military, police and security forces, and exporting to a number of other countries in the region. In 2016 the company had just over 2000 employees and revenue of around £100m.

The Omega Research Foundation has identified a range of different “less lethal” weapons being used by Greek authorities – including potentially lethal tear gas - being used against migrants by Greek security forces at the Turkish/Greek border.

Before gaining independence from Sudan, South Sudan experienced two major civil wars 1955-1972, 1983-2005. In the midst of this violence, civil society actors engaged with the communities and the police to reduce gun violence, and to restore peace and stability. This paper discusses how South Sudanese have resisted and continue to resist violence and militarism and promote nonviolent alternatives to violence.

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