Civil disobedience/NVDA

14 April: Global Day of Action on Military Spending

The International Peace Bureau announced that the date of the 4th edition of the Global Day of Action on Military Spending is  Monday, 14 April 2014. It coincides, once again, with the release by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) of their annual statistics on global military spending.

Plowshares sentencing shows U.S. government afraid of peace activists

Jim Haber

Outside the courthouse in Knoxville, Tenn., where three anti-nuclear activists were severely sentenced on February 18, Michelle Boertje-Obed, the wife of one of the three Transform Now Plowshares members, encouraged everyone to see Judge Amul Thapar’s ruling in a positive light. Despite her husband Greg having just received over 5 years in prison for infiltrating the Y-12 nuclear weapons facility on July 28, 2012 and damaging federal property — along with Michael Walli and 84-year-old Catholic nun Megan Rice – Michelle pointed out that the judge could have easily given them much longer sentences, as recommended by the prosecution.

Support a KEM-MOC activist on trial for a nonviolent action against the military

On December 2012, the antimilitaristic group from Bilbao Grupo Antimilitarista de Bilbao (KEM-MOC) carried out a nonviolent action in an exhibit commemorating the army. For this action, one participant is facing trial, with the prosecutor requesting a 3-year sentence.

South Korea: Challenging Seoul ADEX 2013

Challenging Seoul ADEX 2013Challenging Seoul ADEX 2013As the Seoul International Aerospace & Defense Exhibition 2013 started on 28th October, 22 civil society organizations in South Korea engaged in a series of actions targeting the largest arms fair in the Asia-Pacific region. The coalition organized an alternative exhibition of their own in response to the Seoul ADEX 2013, and named it the Peace and Disarmament Exhibition.

Queering Antimilitarism working group talking point: Militarism and militarization in lgbt*/queer movements

Militarism and militarization in lgbt*/queer movements, and challenges for queer antimilitarists and antimilitarist queers...

Download below a presentation that was used by WRI's Queering Antimilitarism working group in their conference call.

If you would be interested in being part of future conversations on queering antimilitarism, email info@wri-irg.org

Resisting War and Preparation for War: Taking Back Militarised Spaces

The Broken Rifle, No 97, September 2013

By Javier Gárate

This issue of The Broken Rifle looks at actions against sites such as military bases, weapons production plants and state borders, and the role that they play in the preparation and implementation of war and militarism.

A Call for Action at AWE Burghfield 26th August to 7th September 2013

Burghfield Disarmament Camp on Day One. Photo: Zoe BroughtonBurghfield Disarmament Camp on Day One. Photo: Zoe Broughton

By Angie Zelter

In 2016 the UK government will finalise the decision to build a new nuclear weapons system to replace the present Trident system (http://actionawe.org/the-trident-system/). The nuclear submarines that carry Trident are getting old, so the government has pledged to finalise contracts to replace them in 2016 in order to build a new generation of nuclear weapons at an estimated cost of £76–100 billion. This is more than the current planned public spending cuts of £81 billion. If the contracts go ahead, the warheads would be designed and manufactured at AWE (Atomic Weapons Establishment) Aldermaston and Burghfield, in Berkshire, about 50 miles west of London ( http://actionawe.org/awe-burghfield-maps-gates/ ).

Swedish peace activist arrested at weapons factory

War Profiteers' News, No 39

Martin Smedjeback, a nonviolence trainer, active in the antimilitarist network Ofog, was arrested on the evening of July 14th in Malmö, in the south of Sweden. He climbed the fence of the weapons factory Aimpoint, which manufacturers redpoint laser sights used by the US Army and many other military forces around the world. At the interrogation at the police station that same night, he was informed that he would probably be charged with illegal trespass or severe illegal trespass: crimes that have a maximum sentence of six months and two years in prison respectively.

The need for a queer perspective

Back to the Contents of the book

Cattis Laska and Hanns Molander

Militarism is not just a war, an army or a fighter jet. Militarism is a system, a logic and a set of norms that perpetuates and recreates our societies and our daily lives. Queer analysis of power is a political tool that can help us to challenge these norms, and thus, to also challenge militarism.

Direct Action against Militarism

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based on a piece by Cecil Arndt

In different countries, war and militarisation take on very different meanings and have different effects, depending not only on the presence or absence of direct acts of war but also on country's political, economic, and social circumstances, and its history and traditions. As these factors define not only to the types, levels, and effects of militarisation but also the ways in which it can be effectively resisted, the scope of this article is inevitably limited; it can only provide a Western, European, largely German perspective on the use of direct action to oppose the militarisation of youth, although it explores possibilities in other countries nonetheless.

Militarisation, in whatever form it takes, must be understood as always being directed at young people. The militarisation of youth relies not only on their direct recruitment into the armed forces, but on the widely growing intrusion of the military into the lives and minds of people of all ages. This intrusion influences individual daily routines, preferences and choices, as well as general perceptions. The common theme is the normalising of war and the military.

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